Coffee is the number one consumed antioxidant in the United States. And it is widely believed coffee drinkers are less likely to develop dementia and Parkinson’s disease. Coffee also has some protective effects on the liver. Some studies have shown your morning cup of joe may also help offset cardiovascular disease – although we have to keep in mind that could have as much to do with coffee drinkers consuming fewer simple sugars.

What about type 2 diabetes?

Studies on type 2 diabetes and coffee are also proving to be encouraging. A new study recently appeared in the Journal of Natural Products in which scientists reported that a previously untested compounds appeared to improve cell function and insulin sensitivity in laboratory mice. That finding could spur the development of new drugs to treat or even prevent the disease.

Initially, scientists suspected the caffeine in coffee was responsible for reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. But later findings discounted the possibility, instead suggesting other substances may play a more important role.

In one laboratory study, Fredrik Brustad Mellbye, Søren Gregersen and colleagues found that a compound called cafestol increased insulin secretion in pancreatic cells when the cells were exposed to glucose. Cafestol also increased glucose uptake in muscle cells just as effectively as a commonly prescribed anti-diabetic drug. In this new study, the researchers wanted to see if cafestol would help prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in mice.

Researchers divided the mice prone to developing type 2 diabetes into three groups. Two of the groups were fed differing doses of cafestol. After 10 weeks, both sets of cafestol-fed mice had lower blood glucose levels and improved insulin secretory capacity compared to the control. What’s more, ingesting cafestol did not result in hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, a possible side effect of some anti-diabetic medications. The researchers concluded that daily consumption of cafestol could delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in mice, making it a good candidate for drug development to treat or prevent the disease in humans.

Coffee is the number one consumed antioxidant in the United States. And it is widely believed coffee drinkers are less likely to develop dementia and Parkinson’s disease. Coffee also has some protective effects on the liver. Some studies have shown your morning cup of joe may also help offset cardiovascular disease – although we have to keep in mind that could have as much to do with coffee drinkers consuming fewer simple sugars.

What about type 2 diabetes?

Studies on type 2 diabetes and coffee are also proving to be encouraging. A new study recently appeared in the Journal of Natural Products in which scientists reported that a previously untested compounds appeared to improve cell function and insulin sensitivity in laboratory mice. That finding could spur the development of new drugs to treat or even prevent the disease.

Initially, scientists suspected the caffeine in coffee was responsible for reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. But later findings discounted the possibility, instead suggesting other substances may play a more important role.

In one laboratory study, Fredrik Brustad Mellbye, Søren Gregersen and colleagues found that a compound called cafestol increased insulin secretion in pancreatic cells when the cells were exposed to glucose. Cafestol also increased glucose uptake in muscle cells just as effectively as a commonly prescribed anti-diabetic drug. In this new study, the researchers wanted to see if cafestol would help prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in mice.

Researchers divided the mice prone to developing type 2 diabetes into three groups. Two of the groups were fed differing doses of cafestol. After 10 weeks, both sets of cafestol-fed mice had lower blood glucose levels and improved insulin secretory capacity compared to the control. What’s more, ingesting cafestol did not result in hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, a possible side effect of some anti-diabetic medications. The researchers concluded that daily consumption of cafestol could delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in mice, making it a good candidate for drug development to treat or prevent the disease in humans.

So drink up.

 
Source: http://www.tellurideinside.com/2018/02/to-your-healthlive-longer-coffee.html